Saturday, May 14, 2022

CRIMEFEST AWARDS 2022

CRIMEFEST announced the winners of their Awards this evening at the banquet. Congratulations to All!

Adrian Muller, Co-host of CRIMEFEST, said: “After two years of hosting our awards online due to Covid restrictions, we’re thrilled we will be announcing and celebrating the winners of 2022’s CrimeFest Awards in person at our convention in Bristol in May. 

CRIMEFEST has had to postpone its 2020 and 2021 conventions, due to Covid restrictions. Hosted in Bristol, it is one of the biggest crime fiction events in Europe, and one of the most popular dates in the international crime fiction calendar, with circa 60 panel events and 150 authors over four days. CrimeFest is taking place in Bristol, U.K. as I write.

CRIMEFEST 2022 AWARDS

SPECSAVERS DEBUT CRIME NOVEL AWARD

In association with headline sponsor, the Specsavers Debut Crime Novel Award is for crime novels by previously unpublished authors bring vital fresh blood to the genre.

David Heska Wanbli WeidenWinter Counts
(Simon & Schuster)

 

AUDIBLE SOUNDS OF CRIME AWARD

The Audible Sounds of Crime Award is for the best unabridged crime audiobook available for download from audible.co.uk, Britain’s largest provider of downloadable audiobooks.

Richard OsmanThe Man Who Died Twice read by Lesley Manville (Penguin Random House Audio) 

eDUNNIT AWARD

The eDunnit Award is for the best crime fiction eBook

Abigail DeanGirl A (HarperCollins)

 

H.R.F. KEATING AWARD

The H.R.F. Keating Award is for the best biographical or critical book related to crime fiction. The award is named after H.R.F. ‘Harry’ Keating, one of Britain’s most esteemed crime novelists.

Patricia HighsmithPatricia Highsmith: Her Diaries and Notebooks (Weidenfeld & Nicolson)

 

LAST LAUGH AWARD

The Last Laugh Award is for the best humorous crime novel.

Mick HerronSlough House (Baskerville, John Murray Press)

 

BEST CRIME FICTION NOVEL FOR CHILDREN

This award is for the best crime fiction novel for children (aged 8-12)

M.G. LeonardTwitch (Walker Books)

 

BEST CRIME FICTION NOVEL FOR YOUNG ADULTS

This award is for the best crime fiction novel for young adults (aged 12-16).

Angeline BoulleyFirekeeper's Daughter (Rock the Boat)


BEST ADAPTED TV CRIME DRAMA AWARD

Shetland (season 6), based on the books by Ann Cleeves. Produced by Silverprint Pictures, part of ITV Studios. Shown on BBC1. 

https://www.crimefest.com/

WRITERS AND THEIR CATS: Ezra Pound

Happy Caturday! I'm reviving my series on Writers and their Cats. First up: Ezra Pound and his Three Cats. Be sure to check in next Saturday/Caturday!


Friday, May 13, 2022

CWA DAGGER SHORTLISTS 2022


 

 

 

 

 

CRIME WRITERS ASSOCIATION (UK) announced the CWA Dagger Shortlists. Congratulations to all!

DIAMOND DAGGER
WINNER 2022: CJ SANSOM
 

GOLD DAGGER

BEFORE YOU KNEW MY NAME by JACQUELINE BUBLITZ
Little, Brown • Sphere
SUNSET SWING by RAY CELESTIN
Pan Macmillan • Mantle
RAZORBLADE TEARS by SA COSBY
Headline Publishing Group • Headline
THE UNWILLING by JOHN HART
Bonnier Books UK • Zaffre
THE SHADOWS OF MEN by ABIR MUKHERJEE
Penguin Random House • Harvill Secker
THE TRAWLERMAN by WILLIAM SHAW
Quercus • riverrun


IAN FLEMING STEEL DAGGER

FIND YOU FIRST by LINWOOD BARCLAY
HarperCollins • HQ
THE PACT by SHARON BOLTON
Orion Publishing Group
THE DEVIL’S ADVOCATE by STEVE CAVANAGH
Orion Publishing Group
RAZORBLADE TEARS by SA COSBY
Headline Publishing Group
DEAD GROUND by MW CRAVEN
Little, Brown • Constable
DREAM GIRL by LAURA LIPPMAN Faber

JOHN CREASEY (NEW BLOOD) DAGGER

WELCOME TO COOPER by TARIQ ASHKANANI
Thomas & Mercer
REPENTANCE by ELOÍSA DÍAZ
Orion Publishing Group • Weidenfeld & Nicolson
THE MASH HOUSE by ALAN GILLESPIE
Unbound • Unbound Digital
THE APPEAL by JANICE HALLETT Profile Books • Viper Books
WHERE RAVENS ROOST by KARIN NORDIN
HarperCollins • HQ
HOW TO KIDNAP THE RICH by RAHUL RAINA
Little, Brown
WAKING THE TIGER by MARK WIGHTMAN
Hobeck Books
 

HISTORICAL DAGGER

APRIL IN SPAIN by JOHN BANVILLE
Faber
SUNSET SWING by RAY CELESTIN
Pan Macmillan • Mantle
CROW COURT by ANDY CHARMAN
Unbound
NOT ONE OF US by ALIS HAWKINS
Canelo
EDGE OF THE GRAVE by ROBBIE MORRISON
Pan Macmillan • Macmillan
A CORRUPTION OF BLOOD by AMBROSE PARRY
Canongate Books

 

CRIME FICTION IN TRANSLATION DAGGER

HOTEL CARTAGENA by SIMONE BUCHHOLZ
Translated by RACHEL WARD Orenda Books
BULLET TRAIN by KŌTARŌ ISAKA
Translated by SAM MALISSA
Penguin Random House • Harvill Secker
OXYGEN by SACHA NASPINI
Translated by CLARISSA BOTSFORD
Europa Editions UK
PEOPLE LIKE THEM by SAMIRA SEDIRA
Translated by LARA VERGNAUD
Bloomsbury Publishing • Raven Books
THE RABBIT FACTOR by ANTTI TUOMAINEN
Translated by DAVID HACKSTON Orenda Books

 

ALCS GOLD DAGGER FOR NON-FICTION

THE DEVIL YOU KNOW: STORIES OF HUMAN
CRUELTY AND COMPASSION

by DR GWEN ADSHEAD & EILEEN HORNE
Faber
THE IRISH ASSASSINS:
CONSPIRACY, REVENGE AND THE MURDERS
THAT STUNNED AN EMPIRE

by JULIE KAVANAGH
Atlantic Books • Grove Press UK
EMPIRE OF PAIN by PATRICK RADDEN KEEFE
Pan Macmillan • Picador
THE DISAPPEARANCE OF LYDIA HARVEY:
A TRUE STORY OF SEX, CRIME AND THE MEANING
OF JUSTICE
by JULIA LAITE
Profile Books
THE UNUSUAL SUSPECT by BEN MACHELL
Canongate Books
THE DUBLIN RAILWAY MURDER by THOMAS MORRIS
Penguin Random House • Harvill Secker

 

DAGGER IN THE LIBRARY

LIN ANDERSON
MARK BILLINGHAM
SUSAN HILL
EDWARD MARSTON
CATH STAINCLIFFE

 

SHORT STORY DAGGER

BLINDSIDED by CAROLINE ENGLAND
in Criminal Pursuits: Crime Through Time
Editor: Samantha Lee Howe
Telos Publishing
WITH THE OTHERS by TM LOGAN
in Afraid of the Shadows
Editor: Miranda Jewess
Criminal Minds
FLESH OF A FANCY WOMAN by PAUL MAGRS
in Criminal Pursuits: Crime Through Time
Editor: Samantha Lee Howe
Telos Publishing
LONDON by JO NESBØ
in The Jealousy Man and other stories
Editor: Robert Ferguson
Penguin Random House • Harvill Secker
CHANGELING by BRYONY PEARCE
in Criminal Pursuits: Crime Through Time
Editor: Samantha Lee Howe
Telos Publishing
WHEN I GROW UP by ROBERT SCRAGG
in Afraid of the Shadows
Editor: Miranda Jewess
Criminal Minds

 

DAGGER FOR THE BEST CRIME & MYSTERY PUBLISHER

FABER & FABER
HARPER FICTION (HARPERCOLLINS imprint)
MICHAEL JOSEPH (PENGUIN RANDOM HOUSE
imprint)
PUSHKIN VERTIGO (PUSHKIN PRESS imprint)
TITAN BOOKS
VIPER (PROFILE BOOKS imprint)

DEBUT DAGGER 

HENRY’S BOMB by KEVIN BARTLETT HOLLOWAY CASTLE by LAURA ASHTON HILL
THE 10:12 by ANNA MALONEY
THE DEAD OF EGYPT by DAVID SMITH
THE DIEPPE LETTERS by LIZ RACHEL WALKER
 

Winners will be announced at the Daggers Awards Gala Dinner,
Wednesday 29 June at the Leonardo City Hotel on Cooper’s Row in London.
Open to all. To book tickets: www.thecwa.co.uk


Thursday, May 12, 2022

December ’41: Starting a Historical Thriller: Guest Post by William Martin


WILLIAM MARTIN:  December ’41: Starting a Historical Thriller 

You never know where the idea will come from. It may be a story you heard in childhood. It may be a good opening sentence that you jot down, just to see how it sounds, and it prompts a second sentence and a third and suddenly you’re rolling. Or maybe you’re at the movies when the idea strikes. 

That was how it happened for me with December ’41

I was in a crowded Boston theater over Christmas, 2017. I was watching Darkest Hour, the story of Churchill in the spring of 1940. Halfway through, Churchill calls FDR to beg for help. France is falling to the Nazis. The British Expeditionary Force is retreating to Dunkirk. But FDR can offer only encouragement. American neutrality ties his hands. Churchill slumps in despair. 

As we cut to a long shot of Churchill alone in a dark corner of his underground headquarters, I remembered that eighteen months later, Pearl Harbor would change everything. On the night of December 7, as Churchill wrote, he would “sleep the sleep of the saved and thankful.” He would soon travel to Washington to discuss strategy with FDR. And on Christmas Eve, they would stand together on the south portico of the White House to light the National Christmas Tree. 

And what a target they’d make. That thought flashed through my mind, and a plot sprang to life: a Nazi assassin will try to kill them both on that solemn Christmas Eve. 

I knew from the beginning that I wanted to write something different from the generation-spanning multi-plot novel I’m known for. I wanted a tight structure and a short time span. I wanted the characters to be playing for the highest of stakes on one of the biggest stages in history. And I wanted to tell you from the jump where I’d be taking you, then speed you inevitably toward that climax. 

That’s what a good thriller is supposed to do. As author Steve Berry says, “A mystery is about what has happened. A thriller is about what’s going to happen.” And a historical thriller, which is subject to the basic rules of good thriller-writing, also has all that history to contend with. But history can provide the incidents that are the raw material for the scenes that are the building blocks of plot. 

I try never to change history or make historical figures act as they wouldn’t have. I always try to remain faithful to the spirit of the facts if not the letter. And I know that nobody squeezed off a shot at FDR or Churchill on that Christmas Eve. But was anyone worried about the possibility? To find out, I turned to one of the experts, Mike Reilly, FDR’s Secret Service chief. In 1946, he wrote a now-forgotten memoir called Reilly of the White House, in which he described those early days, when the U.S. Army worried about paramilitaries attacking the White House. Reilly’s greatest fear was the lone assassin or the small group dispatched to kill the president. 

It could’ve happened. So my plot premise was solid. 

And I’d already decided to start the book in Los Angeles, because I’d always been fascinated by the L.A. of that era, a pro-fascist hotbed. 

I’d even saved a magazine story about a Nazi compound in a canyon on the west side of town. It was known as the Murphy Ranch (even though it wasn’t a ranch and there was no Murphy). It had provided members of the L.A. German Bund and other fascist groups with a nice little hideaway where they could gather, train, shoot targets, and plan for something called der tag, or the day, as I would write, “when they’d rise up, get rid of all the Jews, and give Hitler a great big down home Hollywood welcome.” They’d even authorized plans for a 40-room mansion that some people thought would be Hitler’s Western White House. Crazy stuff, but true. 

So the next time we visited L.A., we explored this location, an eerie place with graffiti-covered fuel and water tanks, power house, long concrete stairways down from the fire road, and garden terraces for self-sufficient living. As we wandered, I imagined the ghosts, the uniformed guards, the strutting fascists of the Silver Legion or the Bund. I could even see a terrific opening scene when the FBI raids the compound shortly after Pearl Harbor. 

But how would this kick the plot into action? 

What if our assassin is shooting at targets, a last round of practice before he fires the fateful shot. What if he escapes the FBI raid but leaves behind a tiny bit of evidence? 

The manhunt is on, and the novel starts speeding down its track. It will carry us from Hollywood watering holes to the luxurious Santa Fe Super Chief to Washington DC. It will show us a nation awakening from isolation, from the pleasant distractions of swing music and movies, to confront the reality of war? It will depict ordinary Americans – an FBI agent, a Hollywood script reader, a failed actress, a detective, a train porter – meeting their moment in history, stepping out of their personal lives to stop that assassin and, perhaps, save the world. 

How will they do it? Who will live and who will die? How close will the killer get to success? Answering those questions, building suspense in the face of historical fact, excited me during the process of writing and will keep readers excited until they reach the final page. 

***

William Martin is the New York Times bestselling author of twelve novels, an award-winning PBS documentary, book reviews, magazine articles, and a cult-classic horror movie, too. Across a career now in its fifth decade, his books have brought American history to fictional life. The Providence Journal has called him “the King of the historical thriller.” He lives outside Boston. www.WilliamMartinBooks.com

Tuesday, May 10, 2022

DENNIS WATERMAN: R.I.P.

Sad news. Actor Dennis Waterman, known for his roles in TV shows including New Tricks, Minder, and The Sweeney, died Sunday at the age of 74. I loved him in New Tricks with his retro attitude and ways.

From the BBC: 

Actor Dennis Waterman, known for his roles in TV shows including Minder, The Sweeney and New Tricks, has died, his family have said. He was 74.

A statement said: "We are deeply saddened to announce that our beloved Dennis passed away very peacefully in hospital in Spain."

Born in London and educated at the Corona Theatre School, Waterman began his career in a role for the Children's Film Foundation, after which, at the age of 12, he was invited to join Stratford's Royal Shakespeare Company.

He went on to find fame in his teens in William, the BBC's adaptation of Just William.


He became one of the best-known faces on British television in the 1970s when he played Det Sgt George Carter opposite John Thaw in ITV's police drama The Sweeney.


Waterman went on to star in the comedies On the Up and Stay Lucky, before another popular and long-running role as another Cockney detective in New Tricks, which ran from 2003 to 2015.


As Gerry Standing, he starred alongside fellow acting stalwarts James Bolam and Alun Armstrong.

In 2009, he starred in the BBC's hard-hitting drama Moses Jones, a role he said at the time he relished because it cast him in a different light. "I really enjoyed it, because it was a very different kind of character - and that's important," he explained. "On television in Britain, I'm sort of the cheeky chappie, everybody's mate, but I've never played anything like that in the theatre. "It's strange that you get cast as different things in different parts of the media."

His last film role was in Never Too Late in 2020, which was filmed in Australia.


Writing as a Brother-Sister Team: Guest Post by Boyd Morrison and Beth Morrison

Writing as a Brother-Sister Team by Boyd Morrison and Beth Morrison

When people talk to us about writing a novel together, one of the first questions we always get is “How is it writing as siblings? I think that would be a recipe for disaster!” A lot of people might consider working with a sibling on a writing project to be a form of torture, but in truth, we’ve always gotten along, and we’ve loved working together on The Lawless Land. It helps that in writing historical fiction, we each bring specific expertise to the project. Boyd is a New York Times bestselling thriller author, and Beth is a professional medieval art historian, so writing an action-adventure novel set in the fourteenth century has been an ideal blending of our strengths. 

There are several other successful sibling duos, such as Lee Child and Andrew Child and Lynne Constantine and Valerie Constantine (who write under the combined name of Liv Constantine), but as far we know, we are the only brother-sister combo out there in the thriller genre. Being less than two years apart in age, and only one year apart in school, we were always close growing up. We both got our PhDs around the same time, and as adults, we’ve been supportive of each other’s careers. It seemed natural, therefore, to extend that team spirit into an actual collaboration. Of course, it wouldn’t have been possible without modern communication. With Boyd in Seattle and Beth in Los Angeles, we’ve had to contend with physical distance, although both being in the same time zone has worked in our favor. We constantly use text, phone, email, and shared documents to forward the project. Beth uses her commute home almost everyday to get in a good chunk of time with Boyd (and Los Angeles traffic helps prolong those meetings!). 

There are several benefits to working together as siblings. We find that our shared childhood often helps us communicate in a shorthand way that benefits our working relationship. We tend to think along the same lines, having been exposed to each other’s thought processes for so long. And when we reach a particularly thorny plot problem, we can always count on one of us cracking a joke or referring to some funny memory that helps break the tension. Our books also feature both strong male and female characters, so each of us brings something to the table in terms of gender perspective that makes sure we achieve a good balance. We are both lucky to have supportive partners, who don’t begrudge us the family time we constantly need to work on our novel. 

Our working methodology is quite iterative. We spend a lot of time up front devising the plot together. We try to do this part in person, as it is intensive work that profits from long days bouncing ideas around. Once we’ve decided on the entire narrative arc, we undertake the best part of the book-planning process: a trip to Europe where we retrace the journey that our characters undertake, making the most of the inspiration that the real places provide to fill in more of the detail for each of the sections. Eventually there is a chapter-by-chapter outline of all the major elements. Only then does Boyd take over to actually write the scenes. He sends each section on to Beth to give her the chance to weigh in and add all the true-to-life medieval minutiae. Boyd gives it a final polish and we move to the next section. Once we get to the editorial stage, we both read the whole book multiple times, and spend hours on the phone going over each proposed change. We only sign off when we are both thoroughly comfortable with the finished product. 

One of the great secrets to our success is the fact that we value each other’s opinions on all aspects of the book. Neither of us is satisfied until the concerns of the other are addressed. The completed text of The Lawless Land reflects a lot of combined effort. We hope that audiences can read between the lines and sense how much fun we had writing it. 

***

BOYD MORRISON is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of twelve thrillers, including six collaborations with Clive Cussler. His first novel, The Ark, was an Indie Next Notable pick and has been translated into over a dozen languages. He has a PhD in industrial engineering from Virginia Tech. 

BETH MORRISON is Senior Curator of Manuscripts at the J. Paul Getty Museum. She has curated several major exhibitions, including ‘Imagining the Past in France, 1250-1500,’ & ‘Book of Beasts: The Bestiary in the Medieval World.’ She has a PhD in the History of Art from Cornell University.

THE SPOTTED OWL AWARD 2022: Friends of Mystery

Friends of Mystery, Portland, OR fan group, announced the Spotted Owl Winner. The Spotted Owl is chosen by a volunteer committee of Friends of Mystery members. For a book to be considered for the Spotted Owl Award: The author must have primary residence in the states of Alaska, Washington, Oregon, Idaho or the Province of British Columbia. 

Winner: Warren C. Easley for No Witness (Poisoned Pen Press)

Also nominated:

2. Robert Dugoni for In Her Tracks (Thomas & Mercer)
3. Martin Limón for War Women (Soho Crime)
4. Dana Haynes for Sirocco (Blackstone)
5. John Straley for So Far and Good (Soho Crime)
6. Tie — Valerie Geary for The Ophelia Killer (Broken Branch)
6. Tie — Michael Niemann for The Last Straw (Coffeetown Press)
7. Marc Cameron for Bone Rattle (Kensington)
8. Tie — Dana Stabenow for Spoils of the Dead (Head of Zeus)
8. Tie — Amy Stewart for Miss Kopp Investigates (Mariner) 

***

Thanks to The Rap Sheet for this info. I, too, missed the announcement this year!

Sunday, May 8, 2022

MOTHER'S DAY CRIME FICTION // MOTHER'S DAY MYSTERIES

Mother's Day: So many Mothers in Mysteries, but the following is a sampling with emphasis on the Mother's Day Holiday. If I listed all the mysteries and crime fiction with famous and infamous mothers, the list would be way too long. This is an updated list, so let me know if I've missed any titles.

MOTHER'S DAY MYSTERIES

Death by Windmill by Jennifer S. Alderson
Angel at Troublesome Creek by Mignon F. Ballard
The Mother's Day by Peter Bartram
Mother's Day by Frankie Bow 

Mother's Day Mayhem by Lynn Cahoon 
How to Murder Your Mother-in-Law, Mum's the Word by Dorothy Cannell
Mother's Day Murder by Wensley Clarkson
A Holiday Sampler by Christine E. Collier
A Catered Mother's Day by Isis Crawford 
A Darkly Hidden Truth by Donna Fletcher Crow
Motherhood is Murder (Short Stories) by Mary Daheim, Carolyn Hart, Shirley Rousseau Murphy and Jane Isenberg
The Mother's Day Mishap by Kathi Daley
Murder Can Upset Your Mother by Selma Eichler
A Mother's Day Murder by Dee Ernst
Bon Bon Voyage by Nancy Fairbanks
Botched Butterscotch by Amanda Flower
Murder for Mother: Short Story collection, edited by Martin S. Greenberg
Murder Superior by Jane Haddam
A Gift for Mother's Day by K.C. Hardy
The Mother’s Day Murder by Lee Harris
"Pull my Paw"(short story) by Sue Ann Jaffarian
Mother's Day: A Short Story by Renée Knight  (short story)
Every Day is Mother's Day by Hilary Mantel (not exactly a mystery, but a good read)
Mother’s Day by Patricia MacDonald
Mother's Day Out by Karen MacInerney
Mother's Day by Dennis McDougal
Mother’s Day Murder by Leslie Meier
Mother's Day by Joshua Quittner & Michelle Siatalla

Mom, Apple Pie & Murder: A collection of New Mysteries for Mother’s Day, edited by Nancy Pickard

A Mother's Day Murder by Genevieve Scholl
Mother's Day, Muffins, and Murder by Sara Rosett
Mother’s Day by Joshua Quittner and Michelle Slatalla
Comfort Me by Debbie Viguie
Mother's Day by Ron Vincent

True Crime: 
The Mother's Day Murder by Wensley Clarkson

Check out Carissa Chesanek's article 8 of the Most Terrifying Mothers in Crime Fiction on CrimeReads.

Who's your favorite Mother in Crime Fiction?

 

Friday, May 6, 2022

KENTUCKY DERBY MYSTERIES // KENTUCKY DERBY CRIME FICTION

The Kentucky Derby will be held this Saturday. There will be people cheering on the horses, women in big hats, and Bourbon tipplers all around as they celebrate. I've dusted off last year's list of Kentucky Derby mysteries and added a few more titles. And, you can also read horse-racing mysteries to celebrate the Derby --  or you can watch the movie The Kentucky Derby (1922). It's full of grit and crime. Have a piece of Derby Pie (recipes on DyingforChocolate.com), filled with chocolate, bourbon and nuts. Or make some Mint Julep Truffles or Kentucky Derby Bourbon Truffles.

Kentucky Derby Mysteries
King of the Roses by V.S. Anderson
The Silver Falcon by Evelyn Anthony
The False Favorite by Josh Boldt

Triple Crown by Jon Breen
Death in Lilac Time by Frances Crane  
Triple Cross by Kit Ehrman
Intercept by Mary Jane Forbes
Bonecrack by Dick Francis
Triple Crown by Felix Francis

Silent Partner by Karen Jones
Death by Derby by Abigail Keam

Snip by Doc Macomber
Murder at the Kentucky Derby by Charles Parmer
Dark Horse by Bill Shoemaker (Triple Crown)
The Accurst Tower by John Winslow

Kentucky Derby Short Stories
"The Gift" by Dick Francis is set at the Kentucky Derby. It is in the collection Field of Thirteen. "The Gift" first appeared as "A Day of Wine and Roses" in Sports Illustrated, 1973.
Derby Rotten Scoundrels: A Silver Dagger Anthology, edited by Jeffrey Marks
Low Down and Derby, a collection of fast paced mystery stories set around the Kentucky Derby, by fifteen authors from the Ohio River Valley Chapter of Sisters in Crime, edited by Abigail Jones.
Murder at the Races, a collection of Short Stories including "A Derby Horse," edited by Peter Haining.


Children's Mysteries
The Mystery at the Kentucky Derby by Carole Marsh

Non-Fiction

Great Horse Racing Mysteries: Tales from the Track by John McEvoy
Dancer's Image: The Forgotten Story of the 1968 Kentucky Derby (and 5 other non-fiction books about Thoroughbread racing and equine law) by Milton Toby

And there once was a thorough-bred named Mystery Novel. He did not win the Kentucky Derby.

Movies
The Kentucky Derby (1922)

Authors who Write Horse Mysteries 

(not necesssarily about the Kentucky Derby)

Gabriella Herkert, Scasser Hill, Jo Banister, Ben Petersen, Sasscer Hill, Kit Ehrman, Jody Jaffe, Bruce Alexander, Fern Michaels, Jody Jaffe, Carolyn Banks, Michele Scott, Dick Francis, Laura Crum, J.R. Lindermuth, William Murray, Mary Monica Pulver, Rita Mae Brown, Janet Dawson, Maggie Estep, Dick Francis, John Francome, Alyson Hagy, Michael Kilian, Peter Klein, Lynda La Plante, Holly Menino, John McEvoy, Jassy Mackenzie, Robert Nicholas Reeves,J. R. Rain, Bill Shoemaker, Laura Young, Lyndon Stacey, JD Carpenter, Lisa Wysocky, Sally Wright, James Ziskin, Leigh Hearon, Gabriella Herkert, Michele ScottAnnette Dashofy

Other Horse Mystery Short Stories
Murder at the Racetrack, edited by Otto Penzler
Field of Thirteen by Dick Francis 

 

Thursday, May 5, 2022

Theakston's Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year Longlist


This award celebrates excellence, originality, and the very best in crime fiction from UK and Irish authors. A highlight in the literary calendar, past winners include Denise Mina, Steve Cavanagh, Val McDermid and Chris Brookmyre. Awarded annually as part of Harrogate International Festivals’ Theakston Old Peculier Crime Writing Festival, the winner of the most wanted accolade in crime fiction receives a cheque for £3000, and an engraved oak beer cask, hand-carved by one of Britain’s last coopers from Theakstons Brewery. Congratulations to All!


Tuesday, May 3, 2022

CINCO DE MAYO MYSTERIES // CINCO DE MAYO CRIME FICTION

Celebrate Cinco de Mayo by reading a mystery!

Cinco De Mayo, the 5th Of May, commemorates the victory of the Mexican militia over the French army at The Battle Of Puebla in 1862. It's primarily a regional holiday celebrated in the Mexican state capital city of Puebla and throughout the state of Puebla, with some recognition in other parts of the Mexico, and also in U.S. cities with a significant Mexican population. It is not, as many people believe, Mexico's Independence Day, which is actually September 16.

I've blogged about Cinco de Mayo Mysteries before, but I think it's always good to repost -- with a few additions -- for those who missed it or won't take the extra step to click. No judgement here.

This list is supplemented with Mexican mystery writers and books set in Mexico and on the Mexican-American border. Let me know any titles or authors you think should be included.

Add some Mexican Chocolate Treats to add to your Cinco de Mayo celebration. Check out my other Blog, Dying for Chocolate, for recipes and suggestions of great Chocolate for Cinco de Mayo: Chocolate entrees, drinks and desserts and more desserts

Cinco de Mayo Mysteries:

Cinco de Murder by Rebecca Adler

Cinco de Mayo by Robert E. Cook

Margaritas and Murder by Jessica Fletcher, Donald Bain

The Cinco de Mayo Murder by Lee Harris
A Corpse for Cuamantla by Harol Marshall
Cinco de Mayo by Michael Martineck (science fiction/but cross-over)
Cinco de Mayhem by Ann Myers 
The Bane of Cinco de Mayo by Nathan S. Mitchell
The Cinco de Mayo Reckoning by Terry Money

And a few Mexican crime writers who set their mysteries in Mexico but not on Cinco de Mayo. They have not all been translated into English.

Mexican Crime Writers:
Paco Ignacio Taibo II The Uncomfortable Dead (and numerous other novels)
Eduardo Monteverde
Juan Hernandez Luna
Martin Solares
Elmer Mendoza
Rolo Diez
Juan Hernandez Luna
Yuri Herrera

Hardboiled Fiction on the Mexican-US Border or involved with the drug trade: 
Gabriel Trujillo Munoz-known for his science fiction and literary criticism, also writes detective fiction: Mesquite Road, Tijuana City Blues
Carlos Fuentes: Cabeza de la Hidra (The Hydra Head)
Joaquin Guerrero-Casaola: The Law of the Garrotte
Sam Hawken: The Dead Women of Juarez; Tequila Sunset
Rolando Hinojosa: Partners in Crime, Ask a Policeman
Elmer Mendoza: Silver Bullets; Kiss the Detective
Don Winslow: The Cartel; The Power of the Dog; The Border

Other Crime Fiction set in Mexico

Rafael Bernal: The Mongolian Conspiracy
Isabel Canas: The Hacienda
Silvia Moreno-Garcia: Mexican Gothic

Lili Wright: Dancing with the Tiger 

Want to find out more?

Read G.J. Demko's Landscapes of Crime: Mysteries in Mexico
"Mexican Detective Fiction" by Jose Ignacio Escribano on A Crime is Afoot

Read Lucha Corpi's: La Bloga on Chicana Crime Fiction: Where to?
Read an essay by Jennifer Insley "Border criminals, border crime: hard-boiled fiction on the American Frontier in Confluencia: Revista Hispanica de Cultura y Literatura

YA Literature? You Don't Have a Clue: Latino Mystery Stories for Teens, edited by Sarah Cortez (Arte Publico Press)

Interested in Crime for the Holidays? Check out Mystery Readers Journal, Volume 25:1.

And a fun fact: Five most popular Tequilas in the U.S.
1. Jose Cuervo
2. Patron
3. Sauza
4. Herradura
5. Cabo Wabo

And, here's one of my favorite roses: Cinco de Mayo! a repeat bloomer with a unique shape, color, and scent!