Wednesday, January 9, 2013

LONDON UNDERGROUND CRIME FICTION: A LIST

The London Underground is 150 years old today! This Cyril Power print of seated commuters reading newspapers on the tube is from the British Museum’s collection. So this is a perfect jumping off point for a new list! As always, let me know if I've missed any titles. "Mind the Gap"

Crime fiction that takes place on the London Underground: A List

Novels
London Underground by Chris Angus
Death of a Ghost by Margery Allingham
Whispers Under Ground by Ben Aaronovitch
The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown
The Man in the Brown Suit by Agatha Christie
Patriot Games by Tom Clancy
Bryant and May Off the Rails by Christopher Fowler
The Ministry of Fear by Graham Greene
Rogue Male by Geoffrey Household
Baptism by Max Kinnings
The Death of Laurence Vining by Alan Thomas
King Solomon's Carpet by Barbara Vine
Vanished by Tim Weaver
The Blue List by Nigel West

Short Stories
"The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans" by Arthur Conan Doyle
"Crocodile Lady" by Christopher Fowler

Non-Fiction
Underground Overground by mystery author Andrew Martin: social history of the underground railway.

Just an FYI, Mystery Readers Journal will have an issue on Murder in Transit this year.

5 comments:

Mike Gora said...

There's also a fascinating article about bodies and deaths in London's underground at http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/column.php?id=135129

Janet Rudolph said...

Wow.. what a great article. thanks for posting. I'll add a link on the post.

Kent Morgan said...

I've been reading a new book titled The Days and Nights of London Now as Told by Those Who Love it, Hate it, Live it, Left it and Long for it by Craig Taylor. It includes a number of people speaking about their experiences with the underground and as well as one piece about the woman whose voice announces the stations.

John said...

As usual I have an "oldie but a goodie" to add to your list: The Death Of Laurence Vining by Alan Thomas. It has a seemingly impossible murder in a tube station elevator as it's primary mystery.

Donna Fletcher Crow said...

What fun, Janet. It's not a mystery, but neil Gaiman's NEVERWHERE is a wonderful book set in the tube.